ISSaR

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS

Last update
30.07.2013

 


Key question

Is the development of greenhouse gas emissions in the Czech Republic heading to meet national objectives and international commitments?


Key message

The total aggregate greenhouse gas emissions in the Czech Republic in 20111 decreased interannually by 2.9%; since 2000 they have decreased by 8.5%. There is a decrease of these emissions from fuel combustion in the manufacturing industry. Emissions from transport, after a significant increase at the turn of 20th and 21st centuries, have been falling since 2007. The emission intensity of the Czech Republic’s economy gradually decreases, however, it remains above the average in comparison with the other EU27 countries.

Greenhouse gas emissions from electricity and heat generation, which account for the greatest part in the country’s total emissions (over 40%), do not decrease and they stagnate on the levels of the years 1990 and 2000. High emissions from the public energy sector are related to over-generation of electricity, a high proportion of coal-powered power plants in electricity generation and also to so far insufficient energy savings in households and services.

Overall assessment

Change since 1990

Change since 2000

Last year-to-year change


References to current conceptual and strategic documents and their targets

The Czech Republic is a signatory to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol. The Kyoto Protocol binds the Czech Republic to reduce aggregate greenhouse gas emissions in the 2008–2012 control period by 8% compared to the base year 1990. In December 2012, an amendment to the Kyoto Protocol was concluded in Doha, which binds the EU to reduce aggregate emissions of greenhouse gases for the second commitment period (2013–2020) by 20% compared to the year 1990.

A Climate-Energy Package was adopted in December 2008 at the European Community level which def ines the targets and instruments to achieve climate-energy goals by 2020. There is a commitment resulting from the climate-energy package for the Czech Republic, i.e. to reduce emissions in the sectors falling within the EU ETS by 21% by the year 2020 compared to 2005, and in the sectors outside the EU ETS not to increase the emissions by more than 9% over the same period.

Reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the negative impacts of climate change is also one of the priorities of the current State Environmental Policy of the Czech Republic and other national strategic documents such as the National Programme to Reduce the Impacts of Climate Change in the Czech Republic. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions is one of the core areas in the European competitiveness strategy Europe 2020.


Indicator assessment – graphic part

Chart 1: Greenhouse gas emission trends in selected inventory categories, the Czech Republic [Mt CO2 eq.]
Source: The Czech Hydrometeorological Institute

GHG emissions in selected inventory categories, the Czech Republic

 
Data:
 

Chart 2: Greenhouse gas emissions per capita, the Czech Republic [t CO2 eq. per capita, t CO2 per capita]
Source: The Czech Hydrometeorological Institute, The Czech Statistical Office

Greenhouse gas emissions per capita, the Czech Republic

 
Data:
 

Chart 3: Shares of inventory categories on the total greenhouse gas emissions (for the last available year, see data), the Czech Republic [%]
Source: The Czech Hydrometeorological Institute

Shares of inventory categories on the total GHG emissions, the Czech Republic

 
Note:
Without F-gases emissions. The proportion of F-gases in the total greenhouse gas emissions in the Czech Republic is about 1 %.
 
 
Data:

Chart 4: Greenhouse gas emissions in individual inventory categories related to the reference year of the Kyoto protocol (1990), the Czech Republic [% of the reference year]
Source: The Czech Hydrometeorological Institute

GHG emissions in individual inventory categories related to the reference year|of the Kyoto protocol (1990), the Czech Republic

 
Data:
 

Chart 5: Development of the total greenhouse gas emissions and contribution of the individual inventory categories, the Czech Republic [%]
Source: The Czech Hydrometeorological Institute

Development of the total GHG emissions and contribution of the individual|inventory categories, the Czech Republic

 
Data:
 

Chart 6: Specific greenhouse gas emissions per capita (for the last available year, see data), an international comparison [t CO2 eq. per capita]
Source: EEA, The Czech Hydrometeorological Institute

Specific greenhouse gas emissions per capita, an international comparison

 
Data:
 

Indicator assessment – text part

The total aggregate greenhouse gas emissions in the Czech Republic in 20111 decreased by 2.9% (3.9 Mt CO2 eq.) to 133.5 Mt CO2 eq. (excluding the LULUCF sector) and reached the lowest level since 1990. Long-term development of the emissions is characterised by a signif icant decrease in the early 1990s, in connection with economic transformation and investments in environmental protection. After 2000, the emissions fluctuated depending on development of the Czech Republic’s economy; there was a total decrease by 8.5% in the period 2000–2011. Compared with the year 1990, to which the obligations of the Kyoto Protocol are related, the aggregated emissions have fallen by 32% and the Czech Republic’s commitment for the first control period was therefore met by a large margin.

Compared to 2010, the biggest declines of emissions in 2011 were recorded in the household and service categories, including especially household heating (1.6 Mt CO2 eq., i.e. by 13.4%) due to milder temperatures during the winter season, and in the category of fuel combustion in manufacturing and construction industries (1.5 Mt CO2 eq., i.e. by 7.7%). Emissions from the energy sector, which includes the public energy (electricity and heat generation), petrochemical industry and manufacture of solid fuels, decreased interannually only slightly (by 0.8%). The long-term trend in emissions from fuel combustion in the manufacturing industry and construction (i.e. the industrial energy sector) has been decreasing significantly; in 2000–2011, the emissions decreased by 34%, and since 1990 by 63%. Emissions from the energy sector, however, are not declining; in 2011, they were higher by 0.8% compared to 1990, and since 2000 they have fallen by only 1.9%. Reducing emissions from this sector is limited by the increase in electricity and heat generation (by 12.5% since 2000), significant exports of electricity and a great proportion of steam power plants in electricity generation (approximately 62% in 2011).

Emissions from transport, after reaching their maximum in 2007, have been falling; the decline in 2007–2011 accounted for 10.3% (approx. 2 Mt CO2 eq.). In 2011, the emissions from transport decreased by about 1% interannually, however, they were still by more than one third higher than in 2000 due to growth in road transport. Emissions from agriculture have stagnated at about half the level in comparison with the beginning of 1990s. Emissions from waste have been increasing gradually (in 2011 by 1.2%, i.e. by 55 kt), but due to their small share in the total emissions (2.7%), they have minimal impact on dynamics of the total emissions. After the minimum in 2007, the declines in emissions from the LULUCF sector, are increasing significantly and in 2011 they reached the highest value since 2000, namely almost 8 Mt CO2 eq.

In 2011, the largest share in the total GHG emissions is represented by the energy sector (43.8%); almost a half of the total greenhouse gas emissions in the Czech Republic came from electricity and heat generation together with emissions produced by local heating of households and office buildings. In connection with development of emissions from the energy sector, its share in the total emissions has been going up gradually; since 2000 it increased by about 4 percentage points (since 1990 by 14 p.p.). On the other hand, there is an opposite trend in the manufacturing industry; since 2000, its share in the total emissions decreased by about 7 percentage points to approximately 23%.

Companies involved in the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) in the Czech Republic showed a decline in emissions by 1.8% in 2011. In 2012, the decline was much greater – by 6.6% (4.9 Mt of CO2) to 69.3 Mt of CO2. In 2012, the decline in emissions within the EU ETS is larger in absolute terms than the decline in 2011 for the entire emission inventory, which implies not only continuation but even strengthening of the declining trend in the total emissions in 2012. What decreased most in 2012 was the emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels (i.e. the energy sector and fuel combustion in manufacturing industry) – namely by 6.9% (4.5 Mt CO2), and from the production of cement and lime (by 0.3 Mt CO2, i.e. by 9.8%).

In 2011, the emission intensity of the Czech Republic’s economy decreased by 4.7% to 36.8 kg CO2 eq./1,000 CZK at constant 2005 prices, and it was less than a half in comparison with the year 1990, and roughly one-third lower than in 2000. In the European context, however, the Czech Republic’s emission intensity is still above the average; GHG emissions per unit of economic output (GDP) in 2010 were by 56.0% higher than in the EU15 and by 76.6% above the EU27 average. The reason consists in the structure of the economy with a high proportion of industry in GDP generation, over-generation of electricity and high consumption of fossil fuels. Only Estonia, Bulgaria and Poland have significantly higher emission intensity than the Czech Republic. On the other hand, compared to countries like Italy, France or Austria, the emission intensity of the Czech Republic is more than doubled. The Czech Republic’s GHG emissions per capita are also higher than the EU27 average (12.7 t CO2 eq./inhab. in 2011, the EU27 average was 9.4 t CO2 eq./inhab.).

1Data for year 2012 are not, due to the methodology of their reporting, available at the time of publication.


Data sources

The Czech Hydrometeorological Institute
The UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)
The Czech Statistical Office
The Ministry of the Environment of the Czech Republic


Links to additional information

The Czech Hydrometeorological Institute’s Department of Climate Change
UN Framework Convention on Climate Change
The European Environment Agency
The EEA Central Data Repository

 

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